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| Superstrings Chord Name Finder
| by Jim Cranwell ...Millions of Chords  
| Need more frets?

Find the name of any chord!
Just move your mouse over a fret position on the fretboard and click on it to include the note in the chord. If you click on the same string but different place it will change it. If you click on a note already in place... it will remove it
Anything is possible...
The best chord name is usually written right out. If not... whatever displays as the shortest name is usually (not necessarily) the best option to use, unless it says "11th" or "13th" somewhere in the display, then that is probably the chord in question and it's showing you what notes are also included in the chord. When it says 11th or 13th it means there is also a 7th included in the chord (any valid 9th, 11th or 13th chord also has a 7th in it), ... the rest of the chord names shown are the program forcing a chord name out of every single note that was picked in the chord. This program will tell you exactly what's in the chord, if's and's and but's. For instance if you're showing a minor chord (minor third) but you also have the third in it, it will say so... m w3 || Rm33 (root, minor third, with 3) ... anything that is usually in a chord but now omitted is x'd out... no5 no3 etc..
"m" : in the result means minor chord or minor third (augmented 9th and minor third are the same notes), scale chart
The display after the chord name...
|| R is the Root, then the exact notes used in the chord.
Here's the whole shebang || R, d2, 2, m3, 3, 4, d5, 5, a5, 6, b7, 7,
That's Root , dim second, second, minor third, third, fourth, dim fifth, fifth, aug fifth, sixth, flat seven (7th), seven (maj7)
If any display in this format has an extra (more than one) 2, 5, or 7 in it, i.e. d22, 5a5, b77, you can usually rule it out.
m33 might actually be something because augmented 9th and minor third are the same notes
example... "C seventh sharp ninth" is a valid chord... C 7th aug9 w3 || Rm335b7
Set as Tuning...
If you want to change the overall tuning... just enter whatever chord notes would sound if you were playing an open chord in the alternative tuning (if you want "Open E" tuning... click in a regular "E chord") then click "Set Tuning" now the guitar is tuned to that arrangement of notes, "Set Tuning" only changes the notes that you have on the fretboard... any string left blank will remain the same (if you want "drop D" you'll only have to click the 6th string, 10th fret). You can use this (of course) for any guitar tuning and also any tuning for any instrument... Ukulele, Mandolin, Banjo, just tune four or five strings to whatever the instrument tuning is... then use only those strings.
For instance Ukulele tuning " � � 5 5 5 5 " = " � � G C E A "
Virtual Capo:
If you want to use a "Virtual Capo", just click on the same fret level across the neck (for instance third fret " 3 3 3 3 3 3 ") then click "set as tuning", now the guitar is tuned "G C F Bb D G" . (of course you can tune it to an alternative tuning and virtual Capo at any fret or whatever/wherever you want).
Example... "Open E tuning" at the fifth fret... = " 5 7 7 6 5 5 " ..."set as tuning"
Now whatever you click on will be displayed as if you had a Capo on the fifth and were tuned to "Open E" or "A E A C# E A"
Note: you don't have to do this all at once, you could've clicked "5 5 5 5 5 5" (meaning... I want capo 5th fret) then "x 2 2 1 x x" (and "open E" ...which is actually an "A" now because you're at the 5th fret) for the same "open E" 5th fret tuning, whatever notes you have on fret board will add into the tuning.
clear will remove everything and set the guitar back to "E A D G B E" tuning.
2(9) : a ninth note (the same note as second). If you add the 9th note to any chord it would be considered an "add9" chord.
In an true "ninth" chord the "flat seventh" is also included 1, 3, 5, b7, 9 (in a "C9th" or "C7th" chord the "flat 7th" or "b7" ...usually just called "7th" is a "Bb or A# note").
Any chord that says major... "major ninth", "major thirteenth" means the seventh note has been raised 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 (not the ninth or the thirteenth). If the program shows "9" in the display it means the 9th note (or 2nd) is included in the chord. If the program shows something like "minor ninth" you've actually found a true ninth chord variation.
2(9) mnemonic memory device: 2 + 7 = 9
4(11) : an eleventh (the same note as fourth).
In an true "eleventh" chord 1, 3, 5, b7, 9, 11 the ninth and the flat seventh are also included but the 5th and 9th or the 3rd and 5th are usually omitted
4(11) mnemonic memory device: 4 + 7 = 11
6(13) : the thirteenth (the same note as sixth), 
A true "13th" chord includes the... 1, 3, 5, b7, 9, 11, 13
but if you notice there are seven notes ...and that's not going to work on the guitar so the 5th and the 9th or the 9th and the 11th are commonly omitted from chord
6(13) mnemonic memory device: 6 + 7 = 13
Rippin' Weirdest Chord...
This is the weirdest chord I've ever seen in my life...
If you don't believe me,
"click it in" and look at the result,
At first it looks like a mistake, or impossible, but it's not.

Chords for "Rumplestiltskinette" (the babette.mp3)
  || C G/B Am G || D/F# ~ ~ ~ || Em ~ C ~ || A7th ~ ~ ~ ||
  || D Dmaj7 D7th ~ || G ~ A ~ || F#m ~ Bm ~ || G ~ A ~ || D Bb-5 D ~ ||
  || Gm ~ ~ ~ || D ~ ~ ~ || Gm ~ ~ ~ || D ~ B ~ ||
  || Em ~ A ~ || D F#7 B ~ || Em ~ A ~ || G ~ D ~ ||

Flux by Jim Cranwell  © Goddess 401